Richard Moss

Richard Moss

Sharing people's stories

Producer of Ludiphilia; historian, journalist, & freelance writer specialised in features. Covers games, play, tech, science, innovation. Email: rich.c.moss at gmail

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Midwinter 2017 02 06 at 1.34.32 am article
arstechnica.com

Roam free: A history of open-world gaming | Ars Technica

You know the violence, but there were text-adventures, skiing, space, and ants(!) too.

Bertojones that damn shed 800x439 article
arstechnica.com

Easter eggs evolved: Why gamers spent 3-years-plus studying GTAV’s Mount Chiliad

Just below the peak of Mount Chiliad, a huge mountain in the far north of San Andreas, a mysterious mural sits high atop a cliff face. It looks like a map of the mountain's interior—a network of tunnels that connect five small chambers and three large ones with what appear to be a UFO, an egg, and a jetpack within them. Whether it's actually ...

Avatar attacked article
arstechnica.com

Want to see gaming’s past and future? Dive into the “educational” world of PLATO

An educational system helped pioneer sports games, in-game chat, and simultaneous play.

Dsc01189 article
arstechnica.com

An OS 9 odyssey: Why these Mac users won't abandon 16-year-old software

Why? Nostalgia, specific software or hardware, creativity through limitation.

Maze wars plus 2 article
arstechnica.com

Headshot: A visual history of first-person shooters | Ars Technica

Doom, Halo, Goldeneye, Half-Life, Call of Duty... you may recognize a few of these.

Simcity commodore 64 article
arstechnica.com

From SimCity to, well, SimCity: The history of city-building games | Ars Technica

Cities are everywhere. Billions of us live in them, and many of us think we could do a better job than the planners. But for the past 26 years dating back to the original SimCity, we've mostly been proving that idea false.

Aries2 article
arstechnica.com

Remembering Nuon, the gaming chip that nearly changed the world ...

How DVD players and game consoles nearly combined to rock consumer electronics in the '90s.

Tombraidere3 article
arstechnica.com

“It felt like robbery”: Tomb Raider and the fall of Core Design | Ars Technica

In their words, devs say how things got too big, too fast—leading to studio shutdown.

Open uri20130503 20254 1kw1yx3 article
arstechnica.com

Maniac Tentacle Mindbenders: How ScummVM’s unpaid coders kept adventure gaming alive

ScummVM was born on September 17, 2001, at 5:57pm GMT+1. The program was meant as an interpreter that could play classic LucasArts point-and-click adventure games such as Monkey Island, Sam & Max Hit the Road, and Day of the Tentacle in a virtual machine (VM)...

Open uri20130503 23810 g8h4hs article
arstechnica.com

From SimCity to Real Girlfriend: 20 years of sim games

In the process of completing his first game, Raid on Bungeling Bay, Will Wright developed a level editor that he found more entertaining than the game itself. Digging deeper into theories of urban planning and architecture, Wright converted the editor into a stand-alone product—arguably more "software toy" than game—that asked players to build and manage a city.

Open uri20130503 20254 7xml6h article
arstechnica.com

A truly graphic adventure: the 25-year rise and fall of a beloved genre

Space Quest. Day of the Tentacle. Gabriel Knight. Monkey Island. To gamers of a certain age, the mere names evoke an entire world of gaming, now largely lost.

Graphic adventure games struggle to find success in today's market, but once upon a time they topped sales charts year after year. The genre shot to the top of computer gaming in the latter half of the 1980s, then suffered an equally precipitous fall a decade later...